Windows 10 passwords stored as NTLM hashes (or, more specifically, NT hashes) can be dumped and exfiltrated to an attacker’s system in seconds. The hashes can be very easily brute-forced and cracked to reveal the passwords in plaintext using a combination of tools, including Mimikatz, ProcDump, John the Ripper, and Hashcat.

Before we get to any of that, let’s discuss the Local Security Authority Subsystem Service, or LSASS, an essential part of the Windows operating system.

LSASS is responsible for authoritative domain authentication, active directory management, and enforcing security… more


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